Sustainable Packaging

Weekly Packaging News / Evelio Mattos / Adam Peek / Cory Connors

May 27, 2022 Cory Connors Season 2 Episode 116
Sustainable Packaging
Weekly Packaging News / Evelio Mattos / Adam Peek / Cory Connors
Show Notes Transcript

want to be on one of our podcasts? https://www.encasemedia.net/


https://www.linkedin.com/in/eveliomattos/
https://www.linkedin.com/company/packagingpodcast/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/cory-connors/
https://www.linkedin.com/company/sustainable-packaging-podcast/?viewAsMember=true

https://www.linkedin.com/in/adampeek/



https://ororapackagingsolutions.com/
Looking to improve the sustainability of your packaging today? Check out:
https://www.landsberg.com/
The views and opinions expressed on the "Sustainable Packaging with Cory Connors" podcast are solely those of the author and guests and should not be attributed to any other individual or entity. 

https://specright.com/ This podcast is an independent production and the podcast production is an original work of the author. All rights of ownership and reproduction are retained—copyright 2022.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1329820053/ref=as_sl_pc_qf_sp_asin_til?tag=corygat

Weekly with Adam Peek , Cory Connors and Evelio Mattos . Hey, how's it going? Everybody is super loud. I saw your face at them. It was a little, it was, it was loud. That intro is loud. It is, it is a bit loud, man. But how's it going everybody? It's Monday, May 23rd. We've got, uh, Cory Connors at corrugated host of sustainable packaging podcast. And down below, down below, we got Adam peak host of people of packaging podcast. And he's got a selling packaging.com code nails of 2022. What is that? Yeah, so it's a, it's a class that I did in conjunction with the packaging school, where I created a whole bunch of videos, teaching people about some basics of selling packaging in our model. Time. So if you use the code pack sales 2022, you get a 25% discount. We're just trying to get some feedback. I've never done a class like this, the videos that were recorded over a period of about a year. And so. You know, just looking for people to take the class and say, Hey, this was great. This part sucked. And then beautiful thing. It's modular so I can recreate videos as we get feedback. So yeah, I would love would love for people to go take the class. We cover LinkedIn. Uh, we cover use the video at the end of it, uh, CRM. And at the end of it, you get a list of resources, um, and a 30 minute conversation with everyone who graduated, uh, uh, over zoom. Oh, you also get. So you can add it to your LinkedIn, add it to your resume that says you completed the sales operations course of the packaging school. So yeah, selling packaging.com is the website and there's a button to click and then you can go sign up. That's awesome. Oh, we got Michelle. Hey Michelle, how's it going? Um, Michelle on here, um, either we're going to do a podcast soon. I just haven't been feeling the greatest. So I think I haven't recorded much, but, uh, yeah, my name's valley motto. So I'm the host of package design unboxed podcast. Uh, I dunno, where can you find me on Tik TOK, Adam? Yeah, it's at professor packaging. Exactly, exactly what we're here to talk about the news. There's a couple of things. I think before we ended the news, there's been this like idea. That's that's just been running through my head for the last couple of weeks. Thanks Ryan. Uh, it says, if you're listening to this on record, the podcast, Ryan Fox comments, uh, avail Yamato's the automatic closed caption on LinkedIn is where it does it called you belly. Oh, macho. That's your new wrestling name? Th that is how my wrestling now. I feel like I need to mask the names that I get are. I don't know if I go to Starbucks or if I go to a restaurant and leave my name at the counter, what they come back with is my favorite one that I got once was, uh, now I went to, I've learned on Tik TOK that this is not okay to say, but I'm gonna say it anyways. I went to Chick-fil-A. Food. And they asked for my name and I said, Adam, and I got it. Thanks. Spelled N a T O M, which I'm like, well, I guess technically that's right, but I don't know right now. Yeah. Yeah. We got matching news. Um, but something I've been thinking about for the last on her last few days, and I can't remember why this spurred the idea, but I saw at Bronco. Sports like the new ones. Um, and I'm not sure if you've got one buddy listening has one or not, but, um, it was pulled up next to like a full sized Bronco and it doesn't look anything like it. And it made me think a lot of times in terms of like our consumers. Perception, uh, consumers wanting to purchase, you know, wanting to, to, you know, just, just to be consumers just to consume things. It's like, if I can't quite afford the thing that I want, I'm going to get the next closest thing that looks close to it, which isn't always the best solution. Um, you know, it's like they say that the, uh, that the Chrysler 300 looks like a Bentley until it's, you know, next to a valley. Um, it's kinda the same thing. And I think a lot of times we'll buy, we'll buy, you know, fast fashion, we'll buy inexpensive things because they kind of look like something else. I know I've been super guilty of it before. I'm like, Hey, this kind of looks like, you know, whatever. Um, versus just saving and purchasing. The one thing that you really. Um, I mean, there's been a ton of brands out there and, you know, I know this is a packaging podcast, but, or a pocket packaging news feed. Um, but there's been brands like movement, which is a watch brand, which came out with like super cheap watches that looked really expensive. It looked, you know, similar to like IWCs and Panera's and, you know, they took cues for all these watches and made them super cheap and people would buy, you know, 10 watches, uh, And, you know, they would change watches with their, with their clothing and that's cool and do whatever you want to do, but, you know, it's, it's difficult from the packaging side. So I think this is kind of like the dilemma where I kind of wrap it all up here is I love the packaging. I love designing packaging, but at the same time, we're trying to be really sustainable. And if we're packaging, if we're creating packaging for things that are. Not necessarily we're creating unnecessary packaging. Um, but it's difficult because I also got pay my mortgage. Right. So, so where's that, where's that line. I mean, there's definitely clients that I've said no to. Um, but then I don't know. I think everybody impacted you kind of runs into the same thing where you're kind of like at some point you're you just, you realize how much waste you're. Um, and you try to make better decisions and you try to help your brands make better decisions. Um, but when you say, you know, maybe this product isn't necessarily, well, I think it's tough. I think about this from a packaging standpoint where, uh, because I, because I work in like product labels and so it's not an, it's not overall a really big part of. Even folding cartons are not a big part of the overall waste problem. However, if you have a, let's say with like, with the aluminum can allocation problem where people have, have had to buy companies have had to buy bright stock cans and then slap labels and shrink sleeves on. And we've documented that here before that's yes, you have to, you know, you have to do it because, or, or just not sell your product and. And so the tricky part about it is to your point of Leo is like, we'll do we just not sell our product? And let's say, I don't know, you have a hundred employees. Are you prepared to say like, we are going to be so sustainable as a company that we are going to not make product. And therefore we're going to downsize to 50 employees. It's like, is that. Is that the right answer? Or do we just add some labels, add some shrink sleeves, throw it on there and then cross our fingers. And maybe that's like the Bronco sport of, uh, of, of the industry is like, yeah, you just sort of have to compromise. In order in order to, to make it happen. I mean, I posted a Tik TOK two to Michelle's point here where she says the west is a consumer culture. I posted a tech talk about these little like mini vests and mini jackets and mini sleeping bags that are like koozies. And I was like, man, is this really what? It's like a whole wall of this stuff. I'm like, do we really need tiny life vests for our, for our beverages? But that's what people said, like, oh, they're just so cute. I'm like, sure. But do we read it? Was this a product that we needed? People like, well, it's supply and demand, but listen, I understand economics too, but did you have to supply that there? No, but people are going to buy it and then they keep buying it and then you build a business out of it. And then, and then on and on and on now you have to keep making cute little Arctic puffing jackets. So it's tough, which the three of us have talked about this before. Right? Yeah, there's sustainability, but then there's also having a sustainable business. And the importance of having a sustainable business is employees. You know, just everything that goes along with that. So there's benefits to both, but sometimes being on this end, it's a little, uh, it can be a little difficult to be able to eat. What are you thought your thoughts? Yeah. I interviewed Kate from seven swell. Uh, they're a food brand and they use, um, compostable packaging. And she said, the reason why they use compostable packaging is because the first time they ordered a pallet load of their bags, they realized, oh my God, we just made a pallet. Of waste because these aren't going to get recycled. And so that was the epiphany for her and her husband of. We got to do something differently. So they actually have a program where you can send them your, your sentence, well bags, and they will send them to an industrial composting facility, uh, because they've taken this into their own hands. And it's really it's. I think that's a common, you know, realization when you start getting scaling in your business. And I said the exact same thing, there's nothing sustainable about going out of business and. Well, do you think, uh, very white, um, or, uh, sorry. Uh, what was your belly? Belly? Oh, machos Hey Shaundra. When you need it, you think that this. If, if we were to take all of the news that's happening right now. So you've got these products, you've got these food products, people are trying to drive towards sustainability, and then you also have food shortages and inflation that are causing problems. And so adding more expensive packaging, that's, that's potentially further driving up. So for example, food costs. I dunno, it feels like this is, it's a tough time for brands because we've got, we've got all sorts. You know, we've got the inflation, we've got the supply chain crisis. We've got the, the great, the great, uh, what is it where everyone's quitting their jobs? What's that thing called the great resume, the great resume. Uh, you've got all these things happening at the same time. And really, I think to Brad's point. Hey, sir, you just have to take like, take the next. And maybe the answer is, gosh mate, maybe you don't have to make that next product. Maybe that's the most sustainable answer for you right now is, is pull back on some skews and, and make things with more excellence and try to, and try to buy that, that quote, more sustainable packaging at higher volumes so that you can. I know that, that you can, you can not contribute to the, to the inflation that's hitting like the lower to middle-class pretty heavily. Yeah, absolutely. And I mean, that's to Bruce's point, um, Bruce Waldo here on LinkedIn is, you know, it says that begs the question. What's the intention and will it benefit customers and be a good solution for sustainability with supply chain issues? Like you said, uh, you gotta make hard choices for the short term. Uh, You know, I mean that, that's all, that's all for the longterm. Now that Bronco sport that I saw then led me to think about. Um, all right. So how do we eliminate a lot of this excess packaging and then made me think about you, Adam, and the shoes that you collect and, you know, your hundreds of shoes that you get and all the packaging that comes with that. And understanding that the packaging in some cases actually keeps or adds to the resell value of the product. So what if shoes like we're seeing Nike do now? They're they're shipping shoes now and just one box versus two boxes, unless it's a collectible item. Um, you know, what, if we, you know, what if packaging was just plain package? Right. And in most instances, unless it's definitely going to be a product that's on shelf and it's just econ, we don't, you don't have to have this unboxing, which sucks for me to say, because I love designing the unboxing. That's what I'm, that's what I do. That's what I'm known for. So if I completely take myself out of the equation and like what's best, you know, would it make sense to do a completely plain box that's fit for purpose, right? It it's exactly the right size. It has the minimum amount of materials in there. So it can be. Um, and maybe instead of having this amazing unboxing, it's more of a digital asset that comes with the product and we can design an amazing unboxing via digital asset. Right? So like if you purchase NFT is there's like reveals that happen. You know, you purchase a, an image and it just sits there or it bounces around and does something. And then once at some point it actually reveals into what it is that you've purchased. Okay. So you can do like an unboxing in that sense, but then you've got this non fungible token attached to a physical item that you can resell, or you can just individually sell. Um, and I dunno if that makes it doesn't make any sense now, but I don't know if maybe that's a direction that we go, obviously, carbon footprint, right? I mean, carbon footprint for Anaptys is ridiculous now, but things change and things get better. Yeah. I mean, listen, the, the dynamic, the market dynamics are shifting rather rapidly. Um, and so, you know, like there was a story in, in PAC world that showed that over half of us consumers have bought groceries online. Uh we're we're way more comfortable now buying stuff, sight unseen through, through the magic of the internet. And so, so I think to your point, That as e-commerce continues to grow and as online shopping continues to grow for the, we'll say 90% of the products out there, maybe, maybe the board, maybe a boring on boxing is going to be, is going to actually become the norm or it just shows up and you open it and then, and then it's done. Right. So, yeah, I think it's a great, I think it's a great. Yeah, good morning. Thank you for joining us. They eco ship is a free packaging company. They, uh, provide re uh, re-used, uh, packaging to companies and people. Hmm. Wow. People donate packaging to them, and then they provide it to people who need it. It's an awesome company. I've been seeing, um, posts on LinkedIn over the last couple of days for, I can't remember the name of the brand, but it's like, it's a, it's a food company and all of their product comes in jars. I don't know if you guys have seen these and you, they come in a variety of different jars and you wash your jars, put them back in and you ship them back and they fill the product. But it's like a subscription model for groceries that come in these jars. And what's crazy. You know, you might get, uh, an eight ounce of peanut butter or you might get a 10 ounce of peanut butter. Doesn't matter your pay. You're not paying for the volume or the packer. You can just paying for the product at a standard rate. Um, which, which is just interesting, cause it's not like it's the same pack all the time. And I think they also accept jars from other brands and then remove the labels, relabel it, um, pretty, pretty cool. Pretty interesting. And just the terms, there's the idea of reusable packaging, um, versus always buying. Yeah. And I can't remember the brand. That's that's a great point. Yeah. It's a, I don't know how you, how you see anything on LinkedIn these days through all of the hundreds of notifications that I don't know what changed. I don't know if you guys noticed that or not, but all of a sudden it was like, I'd like log in. I'm like, whoa, I have 25 notifications. And it's like, LinkedIn is telling me all about everything that I don't want to know about. So I've had that. Fix that hopefully that's something that, that can be changed. I did find by the way, for those of you who may find this useful, there is a function on LinkedIn that you can turn off seeing it literally says like turn off political content. So that is an option for the, I'm not saying, you know, like people can post whatever they want to post, but stop complaining about it. You can actually just go toggle it on or off. So I thought that was interesting. Did you do that? Did it work? Um, yeah, so far, I mean, I don't really know how they determine what's political or not, but I don't know. I see. I see. We're not as much of that. That's good. Yeah. Yeah. Crazy stuff, man. I mean, I don't know. That was, I mean, that's, that's a lot for me. Would you have, did you guys have any. I got to interview Bob Lilienfeld. Who's, uh, one of my, uh, sustainable idols in the world of packaging. He's a brilliant man. Uh, the founder of spring, uh, check them out on sustainable packaging podcast with Corey Conners. He's he's an awesome guy. Just his insights are really, really bad. So thank you, Bob. That one got to check it out. It came out on last night, right? Yeah. Cool. That's awesome. I've got Paula Unruh on this week, uh, from ATLA pack. Paul is great. Uh, you you'll definitely want to connect up with him. We talked about flexible packaging and LinkedIn and social selling and all sorts of good stuff. So that'll be coming out tomorrow and then. Uh, hopefully I'll also get the replay of this out on Friday, over at, uh, people of acting podcasts. And I'll do it one more plug for the selling packaging.com and pack sales 2022. Uh, just a great, a great easy way. Self-paced to, uh, kind of level up your sales game and understand how to use these platforms. That's a great course. Download it friends. Thanks Corey. For sure, man. That's awesome. Yeah, I got a Scott beers, Zach. Who's a. Type designer. Um, and we talk about some of the types of these design, how to apply type to packaging. And I asked him really stupid questions, you know, when it comes to even as a designer, when it comes to type, you know, I think I'm better than I am. And I just asked some really basic questions and I realized that I maybe not as good as I thought, but it was, it was great. Cause you know, he's a T he designs type and he just, he designed some type right out of school. Years ago, which just got picked up and used by, uh, JKR for the rebrand of Magnolia bakery, which is a pretty big deal. We go through the process of designing it and like what happens when some, they wanted, some of these things happen, uh, you know, when sort of uses your, your, your fonts and stuff you're you're type for, um, for, for a rebrand. And, uh, it definitely learned a lot there. Uh, I'll definitely be a little bit more. Conscious of how I use type a as well as discuss it. Um, so definitely, definitely something, uh, to listen to. I also had Matt Hensley, who I've known for quite a while. He's amazing 3d artist, packaging designer. He's a packaging engineer from, I believe, RIT that then transitioned to packaging. Which you don't very much, you don't often get an engineer to design. Um, so he did that transition and he's done some really cool packaging, uh, over the years. And he's now with enlisted, um, out of, uh, out of SF, which is pretty, pretty awesome. Yeah. Oh, that's right. They are, they are in Utah. That's right. Yeah. We're all wondering, how long are you going to make Jonathan Quinn wait to be on your show going be two years, three years. No, I just gotta get settled. I gotta get settled next week. I'm actually, I'm actually going to, um, uh, moving to Spain for the summer. Uh, So I've got, you know, there's a lot of balls up in the air at the moment, but once, once I get settled, I definitely want to have Jonathan quit on. And for anybody that's not familiar, Jonathan Quinn is with what three previous starts with a P uh, yeah, so he's with prejudice and they're a plastics company does a lot of flexible plastics. And we were on stage together in Vegas where I let him know that I hated. And it was a good time. Yeah. But on a mask, the full, the full belly of machos came out and you're on stage and he asked you a question and it was like, when I first met you, I hated hearing your voice now he's my buddy. So he's definitely gonna be. Good stuff, guys. Um, we've got to wrap up Michelle. You've got a question. What's the future of packaging considering supply chain issues. I think that's a great question that we can answer next time. Um, appreciate you guys being on and listening to us and posting your comments. Uh, if you have any questions on this or anything else, please keep posting with the comments. Either the three of us or somebody else that may be even more qualified to answer your question. We'll definitely hop on here and answer them. So definitely keep posting. We'd love to hear where you guys are listening from. It's always great to see how far and wide this, uh, the show reaches, uh, but definitely checks out once again. My name is. Belly. Oh, machos that's right. You got Rebecca saying belly machos takes over Spain. It's going to be another movie. It's going to be like bore at except the packaging version. Well, that's right. It will be awesome. We'll be getting some, some good content out of there. All right guys, CFC. This is packaging news weekly, Adam Corey potters. Belial mottoes.